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Contempt of Court

Contempt of court is a serious offense in England and Wales, which can result in severe legal consequences. It refers to any action or behavior that interferes with the administration of justice or undermines the authority of the courts. Contempt can be classified into two broad categories: civil contempt and criminal contempt.

Civil contempt of court occurs when a person disobeys a court order, such as failing to pay a fine or comply with a court judgment. In such cases, the court can use its powers to punish the offender, usually by imposing a fine or a period of imprisonment until the person complies with the order.

Criminal contempt of court, on the other hand, involves actions that threaten the dignity or authority of the court, such as disrupting court proceedings or intimidating witnesses. This type of contempt can be punished with imprisonment, a fine, or both.

The law governing contempt of court in England and Wales is primarily based on common law principles, but it is also regulated by statute, including the Contempt of Court Act 1981. The Act provides a framework for the law of contempt, outlining the types of behavior that can constitute contempt and the penalties that can be imposed for such conduct.

One of the most significant features of the law of contempt is the power of the court to impose its own penalties for contemptuous behavior. This power is known as “summary jurisdiction” and allows the court to act quickly and decisively to protect its authority and the administration of justice.

The courts have wide discretion in deciding what constitutes contempt of court and what penalty should be imposed. The court must balance the need to protect its authority and the administration of justice against the fundamental right to freedom of expression. As a result, the law of contempt is constantly evolving, with judges frequently revising and refining the principles that govern contempt of court.

Contempt of court is often associated with the media, particularly when reporting on ongoing court cases. The media has a duty to report fairly and accurately on court proceedings, but it also has a responsibility to avoid publishing material that could prejudice a trial or interfere with the administration of justice. This includes publishing material that could influence potential jurors or undermine the credibility of witnesses.

The Contempt of Court Act 1981 provides specific rules for reporting on court proceedings, including restrictions on publishing certain information about ongoing cases. The Act also provides defenses for journalists who are accused of contempt of court, such as reporting on a matter of public interest or reporting on a court decision.

The penalties for contempt of court can be severe, including imprisonment and fines of up to £2,500 for civil contempt and up to two years in prison and/or an unlimited fine for criminal contempt. The court can also award costs against the offender and may order the offender to pay damages to any party that has suffered as a result of the contemptuous behavior.

In summary, contempt of court is a serious offense in England and Wales that can result in severe legal consequences.

The law of contempt is primarily based on common law principles, but it is also regulated by statute, including the Contempt of Court Act 1981. The courts have wide discretion in deciding what constitutes contempt of court and what penalty should be imposed, and the law is constantly evolving to balance the need to protect the authority of the courts with the fundamental right to freedom of expression.

The media has a particular responsibility to report fairly and accurately on court proceedings, and the Contempt of Court Act 1981 provides specific rules and defenses for journalists who are accused of contempt of court.

You can use the form FC600 to ask the court to consider an allegation of contempt of court and to apply for an order determining contempt proceedings in the family court. Family procedure rules 37.3 and 37.4.

PART 37 – APPLICATIONS AND PROCEEDINGS IN RELATION TO CONTEMPT OF COURT

You can use the form N600 to ask the court to consider an allegation of contempt of court and to apply for an order determining contempt proceedings in a civil court. Civil procedure rules 81.3 and 81.4.

PART 81 – Applications and Proceedings in Relation to Contempt of Court

Can a barrister be in contempt of court ?

Yes, a barrister can be in contempt of court if they engage in conduct that interferes with the administration of justice or undermines the authority of the court.

Barristers, as officers of the court, have a duty to uphold the law and to act in the best interests of their clients while maintaining the integrity of the court. If a barrister fails to fulfill this duty, they may be found to be in contempt of court.

Examples of conduct that may amount to contempt of court by a barrister include making false or misleading statements to the court, knowingly misleading the court, failing to comply with a court order, or engaging in behaviour that disrupts or interferes with court proceedings.

If a barrister is found to be in contempt of court, the court has the power to punish them by imposing a fine, a period of imprisonment, or both. In addition, the barrister may face disciplinary action by their professional regulatory body, such as the Bar Standards Board.

It is important to note that barristers are held to a high standard of professional conduct, and any breach of that conduct can have serious consequences for both the barrister and their client. As such, it is essential that barristers adhere to their professional obligations and act with integrity and honesty when representing their clients before the court.

Read the reviews of Gavin Howe Barrister

“He is awful, underhanded and should not be practising law!”

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By Dom Watts

Dom Watts is the founder of the Ministry of Injustice. Dom works in IT and has no legal training and is not a lawyer. You can find Dom on X or Google.

In 2002 Dom Watts was an unlikely consumer champion. The dad of three from Croydon took on the power and might of Kodak – and won………

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